Cammie McAtee

Cammie McAtee

Cammie McAtee is an architectural and design historian and curator based in Montreal. She completed her doctorate in 2017 in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University. Her dissertation, a close study of the issue of form in postwar American architecture, was selected by two prestigious granting agencies for support: the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada; and the Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts of the National Gallery of Art, where she held the Wyeth Predoctoral Fellowship.

McAtee has held several positions in architectural archives and museums. Between 1994 and 2002, she was a curator at the Canadian Centre for Architecture, where she curated exhibitions on such diverse subjects as penitentiaries (with David Vanderburgh; 1995), ideas of the road in architecture (1996), toy towns (with the British architect Peter Smithson; 1998), the American students of Mies van der Rohe (2000), and adapted the Royal Academy/Sir John Soane’s Museum’s touring exhibition John Soane: Master of Light and Space for presentation at the CCA (2001). Her major project was the CCA/Whitney Museum of American Art exhibition and book Mies in America (2000-2002), for which she was assistant curator and lead researcher.

Since 2017, she has been a consulting curator, researcher, writer, and editor. She organized the exhibition Montreal’s Geodesic Dreams: Jeffrey Lindsay and the Fuller Research Foundation Canadian Division (Centre de design, Université du Québec à Montréal, 2017) and edited the accompanying catalogue (Dalhousie Architectural Press, 2017). Between 2018 and 2020, she was the lead researcher and consulting editor for the National Gallery of Canada’s exhibition and book on Enrico Peressutti/BBPR’s Canada Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Her curatorial work has been supported by the Canada Council for the Arts.

McAtee’s research focus is postwar architecture and design in North America and Europe. In addition to numerous scholarly articles and essays, she is co-editor of The Politics of Furniture: Identity, Diplomacy and Persuasion in Post-War Interiors (with Fredie Floré, Routledge, 2017). She is currently working on two projects: The Lives of Form: How the Death of Functionalism Reshaped Mid-century American Architecture (MIT Press); and a collaborative research project with Fredie Floré on the US-based modern furniture company Knoll’s expansion into Europe and the rest of the world. In connection with the latter project, she will be associated with the a2I Research Group from September 2022 to June 2023.